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Covid 19 May Limit The Use of Anti-Hyperglycaemic Agents. Does It Call for The Development of New Anti-Hyperglycaemic Agents?

Author(s):

Ntethelelo Sibiya*, Bonisiwe Mbatha, Charles Arineitwe, Chiamaka Onyekwuluje, Phikelelani Ngubane and Andile Khathi  

Abstract:


Diabetes mellitus has been identified as major risk factor for developing severe COVID 19 complications. In this review article, the efforts were directed to provide insights and possible extent at which some diabetic pharmacological interventions may exacerbate COVID 19 or may not be idyllic options in COVID 19 patients. Articles reviewed were identified using Google scholar database, and search was done using English language. Anti-hyperglycaemic are associated with undesirable effects including episodes of hypoglycaemia, diarrhoea, lactacidosis and increased risks of cardiovascular and hepatic hazards. These undesirable effects associated with the anti-hyperglycaemic agents possess a threat of developing severe COVID19 complications Therefore, this calls for more studies to understand the extent of the risks these agents possess in diabetic COVID 19 patients. It is apparent that almost all the anti-hyperglycaemic agents have the potential to worsen COVID 19, despite their class. COVID 19 may limit the options in terms of available anti-hyperglycaemic agents which may not heighten the risk of developing severe COVID 19 complications. The research towards the discovery and development of new compounds and also new therapeutic targets for hyperglycaemia should be encouraged and welcome.

Keywords:

COVID 19, anti-hyperglycaemic, morbidity, mortality, diabetes mellitus, therapeutic target.

Affiliation:

Pharmacology Division, Faculty of Pharmacy, Rhodes University, School of Laboratory Medicine, College of Health Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pharmacology Division, Faculty of Pharmacy, Rhodes University, Pharmacology Division, Faculty of Pharmacy, Rhodes University, School of Laboratory Medicine, College of Health Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, School of Laboratory Medicine, College of Health Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal



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